UNSERE 
Marken

Marken mit langer Tradition finden Sie neben jungen Designerlabeln und Herstellern die Sie vielleicht noch nie im Designbereich wahrgenommen haben. In der heutigen Warenwelt steht eine Marke für mehr oder weniger gerechtfertigtes Vertrauen der Verbraucher in Proportion zum Marketingbudget. Formost spricht lieber vom Gebrauch und wirklich gerechtfertigten Vertrauen und prüft seine Hersteller intensiv. Sollten Sie unser Siegel "gute Ware" bei einem Produkt finden, handelt es sich um ein Markenprodukt nach unserem Geschmack.

Desginer dieses Herstellers

Show all

News & Stories

Show all

Entries from our blog

Interessante Artikel & Themen anderer Web-Seiten, die wir empfehlen möchten.
649297_81_66559_KNVkbGEzQ.jpeg
SOURCE: CORE77.COM

Design Experience That Matters, Book Review: The Other Side of Innovation

We love Vijay Govindarajan and Chris Trimble's Other Side of Innovation, specifically the second half of the book. For anyone who has ever resented being asked to write a business plan, Govindarajan and Trimble's book will at last explain the profound difference between planning and prediction.

Consider that at the moment you decide to explore a new product, you will never be dumber about your customer, their needs and your opportunity. The big idea in Other Side of Innovation is how to manage product development as a "disciplined experiment." Applying the scientific method to design thinking involves establishing a "hypothesis of record." This tool helps the product manager answer their two most important questions: what are we spending money on, and why?

When trying to figure out whether our new product is a good idea, to paraphrase David Hume, our confidence should be proportional to the evidence.
An example "cause and effect" diagram.  What are the steps necessary to take our product idea through to production?  Then, consider the assumptions built into that process.  What has to be true for steps A and B to lead to step C, and so on?
Given all of the assumptions we identified through the cause and effect diagram, consider a framework that weights assumptions according to our confidence (reasonably certain, educated guess, wild guess) and the consequences if the assumption proves false (minor problem, serious problem, catastrophe).
We might imagine a hierarchy of assumptions, the most dangerous ones being low confidence and high stakes (the top right box). 
At DtM, we use this framework to determine program priorities.  The first dollar we spent on product development must go towards emptying that top right bucket (low confidence, high risk).  We might increase our confidence by conducting user and market research, or by building a physical prototype, or by recruiting new partners with the necessary expertise onto the team.   If this approach allows us to falsify a critical assumption, hooray!  We haven't wasted much time or money.

To build a hypothesis of record, the team must first create a "cause and effect" diagram, a simple flowchart of the steps necessary to reach the ultimate objective (in DtM's case, saving millions of lives in poor countries). The team then identifies the most critical assumptions embedded in the plan, stated in a way that meets Karl Popper's standard for "falsifiability." The team then defines a set of experiments that will test those key assumptions as quickly and cheaply as possible. When an experiment proves a key assumption false, you know it's time to update your hypothesis of record.

Every design firm brags about "failing as fast as possible." Govindarajan and Trimble's book explains how to do it with rigor. This approach has become the basis for all of DtM's strategic planning. Check it out! And if you buy the book through the links in this email, Amazon will send part of the proceeds to DtM! [Other Side of Innovation]

go to entry
538000_66098_57767_6edya3s3l.gif
SOURCE: CORE77.COM

US History Through NARA's Collection of GIFs, How a Designer Reverse-Engineered the Sanitary Pad and Tussie-Mussies For Millennials 

Core77's editors spend time combing through the news so you don't have to. Here's a weekly roundup of our favorite stories from the World Wide Web

NARA Gets Into GIFs

United States Forest Service mascot, Woodsy Owl, gets rid of some trash

Take a break from negative political commentary and remember some strange times in US history through the National Archives and Records Administration's new Giphy account. 2016 is weird.

—Emily Engle, editorial assistant

How an Indian Innovator Reverse-Engineered the Making of Sanitary Pads

A surprisingly touching read detailing the story of a man in India obsessively determined to reverse engineer an efficient sanitary pad for his wife and women within the country. It is also an interesting dive into how circumstance and context plays into innovation. As noted in the article, "'people who operate in a resource-constrained environment tend to seek the most efficient ways of solving a problem," says Calestous Juma, a professor of development at Harvard Kennedy School. 'For this reason, they rely on their creativity and resourcefulness more than those who have access to more assets. In such cases, innovation is an essential aspect of individual and community survival.'" 

—Allison Fonder, community manager

When the World Truly Stank, Tussie-Mussies Were a Breath of Fresh Air

Hold tight for the next Core77 One-hour design challenge: "Tussie-Mussies for Millennials" - seriously, start warming up.

—Eric Ludlum, editorial director

Trump Victory Jolts Automakers

This Reuters article describes what effects Trump's protectionist policies might have on the U.S. auto industry, which is reliant on Mexican production facilities and suppliers. "Mexico now accounts for 20 percent of all vehicle production in North America," and if that cross-border trade is shut down, it is U.S. consumers who would likely face higher prices. "(Trump's) trade policies could add $5,000 or more to the price of a small car from Mexico," said Charles Chesbrough, senior economist at the Detroit-based Original Equipment Suppliers Association trade group.

—Rain Noe, senior editor

go to entry
FORMOST

We believe that a truly good product is inherently beautiful and useful. This kind of beauty does not happen by accident though! At Formost we do not only find good products for you but we test them and tell the stories of the people behind these products. This way you experience a story while receiving something which shall last for generations and accumulate some nice stories itself.

Please wait